When was the California state fossil Smilodon adopted?

Which is the official state fossil of California?

Official State Fossil of California. California designated the saber-toothed cat as the official state fossil in 1973 (California also recognized an official state dinosaur in 2017). The saber-toothed cat (Smilodon californicus) was common in California 40 million years ago.

When was the California state fossil Smilodon adopted?

June 21, 1973
The Assembly followed suit and, on June 21, 1973, voted 72-0 without debate, to adopt Smilodon as the official state fossil of California. The Assembly followed suit and, on June 21, 1973, voted 72-0 without debate, to adopt Smilodon as the official state fossil of California.

Does every state have a state fossil?

Several states have fossils unofficially designated thanks to a fossil being designated as the “State Dinosaur” or “State Stone”. There are 7 states without a state fossil designation, Arkansas, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, New Hampshire and Rhode Island.

Are there any fossils in the state of Texas?

Just like every state has an official state bird (Missouri’s is a Cardinal), or state flower (Texas’ is the Bluebonnet), or even a state food (Georgia’s is the peach), or state fish (Michigan’s is the Brook trout), every state also has a state dinosaur. More specifically, a state ‘fossil.’

When was Smilodon californicus adopted as a state fossil?

Adopted on September 25, 1973 The sabre-tooth cat, Smilodon californicus, was adopted by the Legislature as the official State Fossil on September 25, 1973. Sabertoothed cats are the most famous California Sabertoothed cats are the most famous California Ice Age fossil.

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Is the saber tooth cat the state fossil of California?

Sabre-tooth cat fossil from La Brea Tar Pits; photo © Garry Hayes: Modesto Junior College Geology Dept. (all rights reserved; used by permission). California designated the saber-toothed cat as the official state fossil in 1973 (California also recognized an official state dinosaur in 2017).

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